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In Re Gault Case Marks 50th Anniversary 5/23/17  05/23/17 5:39:19 PM Printer Friendly VersionPrinter Friendly Version


Christine M. Henningsen (left) assigns participants to small groups after presenter Joy M. Suder announces the second phase of the three-hour juvenile defender training.

In Re Gault Case Marks 50th Anniversary
By Lorraine Boyd
The Daily Record
Fifty years ago this year, the United States Supreme Court handed down their landmark decision, In re Gault. Justice Abe Fortas wrote, “The condition of being a boy does not justify a kangaroo court.” Thus began the granting of legal rights to children facing prosecution in criminal court, including the right to an attorney, to remain silent, to notice of the charges made by the state, and to a full hearing on the merits of the case. The catalyst for this decision was the case of 15-year-old Gerald “Jerry” Gault, who without the benefit of any of those rights and more, was sentenced to six years incarceration for a prank phone call. The Supreme Court agreed to determine whether Arizona’s Juvenile Code violated the Due Process Clause of the 14th  Amendment. The 2017 Law Day activities were centered around the 14th Amendment, which was ratified 150 years ago.
One hundred years later, juveniles earned those rights. In honor of the occasion, Creighton University School of Law, in partnership with the Nebraska State Bar Association Juvenile Law Section and Nebraska Youth Advocates, hosted a luncheon, panel discussion and workshop on May 15 at Creighton University. The Youth Panel Presentation was facilitated by the Hon. Lawrence D. Gendler, with panelists Sarah Mitchell and Houston Noe. The workshop following the panel was presented by certified trainers from the National Juvenile Defender Center’s Juvenile Training Immersion Program, and led by Joy M. Suder and Christine D. Henningsen.  It was open to juvenile defense attorneys or those assisting in defending juveniles. They explored “Motions Practice and 4th Amendment Challenges.”r, juveniles earned those rights. In honor of the occasion, Creighton University School of Law, in partnership with the Nebraska State Bar Association Juvenile Law Section and Nebraska Youth Advocates, hosted a luncheon, panel discussion and workshop on May 15 at Creighton University. The Youth Panel Presentation was facilitated by the Hon. Lawrence D. Gendler, with panelists Sarah Mitchell and Houston Noe. The workshop following the panel was presented by certified trainers from the National Juvenile Defender Center’s Juvenile Training Immersion Program, and led by Joy M. Suder and Christine D. Henningsen.  It was open to juvenile defense attorneys or those assisting in defending juveniles. They explored “Motions Practice and 4th Amendment Challenges.”
 
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